Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB)

Please be reminded that Safe4me is NOT a standalone resource; it is designed as a toolkit to support educators to deliver information to pupils on a particular topic, covering elements specific to the law, risk and consequences to help develop skills and understanding to promote safe and responsible behaviour.

Although aimed at KS2 (primary age), resources in this toolkit are designed to be flexible and adaptable to meet individual needs, age and ability, and can be used in one or multiple lessons.

Additional information leaflets for young people, professionals and parents can be accessed via the link buttons below; useful information, advice and resources are provided by a host of other organisations relating to this topic; these can be accessed via the additional resources button.

Aims

  1. To develop understanding of what Anti-Social Behaviour is
  2. To develop understanding of how Anti-Social Behaviour affects the community
  3. To develop understanding of the law associated to Anti-Social Behaviour
  4. To develop knowledge of how and where to get support

Learning Outcomes

  • Learner to understand the definition of what constitutes Anti-Social Behaviour
  • Learner will understand types of Anti-Social Behaviour and the community impact
  • Learner is aware of the Law, Powers and associated consequences of ASB
  • Learner will know of support services available and how to access them

Lesson Resources

Each of the 4 tasks aligns with the aims and learning outcomes, giving users flexibility to deliver the learning. Guidance and activity resources can be accessed under the relevant tabs and links below.

Setting the Learning Environment and Welfare

Safe4me recognises the importance of planning and preparing pupils for learning; please read the guidance below prior to using the resources to ensure the best possible learning experience and outcomes for pupils.

Welfare

  • Ensure pupils have been prepared prior to learning about the topic, being mindful of the nature and sensitivity of some subjects.
  • Reassure pupils that they are not expected to give real life experiences
  • Avoid personalising or directing questions i.e. ‘Has anyone ever seen/done/been affected by……’
  • Be aware of safeguarding regarding disclosures or concerns for welfare and safety.
  • Consider pupils who may wish to ask questions, express views or contribute in ways other than verbally i.e. a ‘post box’ in the classroom/school.
  • Explain procedure for leaving the class if pupils feel upset or uncomfortable i.e. where/who to go to.
  • Ensure pupils are aware of follow-on support; include staff in school and other services recommended in the additional resources section or Safe4me support services directory.
  • Consider follow-on work is planned to further develop the learning

Ground Rules

  • Set out boundaries: what is expected, what won’t be tolerated and any subsequent consequences
  • Introduce topic, explaining considerations needed when contributing i.e. feelings and values of others
  • Explain objectives, process, and the value of exploring the topic – allowing pupils time to prepare for learning
  • Explain the value of peer-learning through shared values, views and knowledge; highlighting the value of listening if choosing not to contribute verbally.

Getting started

The getting started section provides a choice of activities designed to capture base knowledge, break the ice and prepare pupils for learning about Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB). Some activity options can be re-visited after completing all the tasks/modules in the ASB toolkit to provide evidence to the learning journey.

Three activity options are provided to offer flexibility to meet the needs and abilities of individuals, these can be completed as a whole class, as part of a discussion, in small groups or as individuals.

Activity option 1: Class Graffiti Wall

Using an A-Board, White Board or papered wall, display ‘Anti-Social Behaviour’ (ASB) in the middle and invite children/young people to draw or write something they already know about what ASB is, or what they would like to know.

  • Suggest thinking about actions/behaviours, locations, victims/offenders and laws
  • Consider the work remaining on display throughout the lesson as a visual aide/reference.
  • Consider re-visiting later for the children/young people to add things learned

Activity option 2: Knowledge Blast Sheet

Printable worksheet which allows children/young people to record what they already know, what they would like to know, and what they have learned about ASB, with focus on behaviours and impacts.

This can be used to capture and evidence the learning journey. Consists of a ‘before’ section to capture base knowledge at the start, and an ‘after’ section to complete when all tasks in the toolkit have been carried out.

Knowledge blast sheet

Activity option 3: ‘Before & After’ Knowledge Sheets

Similar to activity option 2, this is a printable worksheet which also allows children/young people to record what they already know, what they would like to know, and what they have learned about ASB, with focus on behaviours and impacts.

The difference in this version is that it allows children/young people to either draw or write what they already know, and what they have learned about ASB. This version is suitable for those children/young people who have difficulty writing. It is recommended that this version is completed by individuals.

Before and after knowledge sheet

What is Anti-Social Behaviour?

Task 1 is intended to meet the learning outcome for aim number one. Building on the base knowledge from the starter activity, this activity looks to develop children/young people’s understanding of what ASB is based on Home Office definitions.

Two activity options are provided to offer flexibility to meet the needs and abilities of individuals which can be completed either as a whole class, as part of a discussion, in small groups or as individuals. Both activities encourage participants to read and interpret key terms and wording within the definition to gain a clearer understanding of what ASB is.

Facilitator Information

The correct definition for both of the task activities:

‘Anti-social Behaviour is any behaviour or act by a person or group likely to cause others harassment, alarm or distress or which causes a nuisance to the community or impact on the environment’

Key words & terms

It is recommended the facilitator checks that the key words and terms below are understood by participants to enable them to complete the task and to support their learning experience.

  • Any behaviour or act
  • Harassment, alarm or distress
  • Nuisance
  • Community
  • Impact on the environment

In order to complete the activities, you will need to print the relevant activity sheet.

Activity Option 1: ASB Definition Puzzle

A full definition of ASB separated into 8 sections for participants to put in to the correct sequential order.

Definition puzzle sheet

Activity option 2: ASB Definition Worksheet

One worksheet containing two short activities. The first activity gives a full definition of ASB with four words or terms missing. Four choices are provided for participants to place into the definition correctly. The second activity requires the participant to list types of behaviour they think amounts to ASB.

Definition worksheet

Move onto Task 2 – ‘ASB scenario exercise’

ASB Scenario Exercise

Task 2 is intended to meet the learning outcome for aim number two, building on the learning from task one. This is 2-part activity is designed to increase children/young people’s awareness and understanding of types of ASB and the impact it can have on others and the environment.

The activity offers flexibility to meet the needs and abilities of individuals, and can be completed as a whole class, as part of a discussion, in small groups or as individuals. Supports RRR work with focus on the feelings of others through promoting respectful and considerate behaviour.

Facilitator Information

To complete the exercise, you will need to print the 22 ASB flash cards provided in the links below which consist of:

  • 6 x locations
  • 9 x types of behaviour
  • 6 x types of victim

You may wish to use pictures of your own, choosing local locations to make the learning experience bespoke to your community.

Part 1

Participants to use at least 1 card from each of the 3 categories to discuss how they can be linked to an ASB scenario, paying attention to:

Why the location may be an ASB ‘hotspot’
How the type of act/behaviour may be seen as ASB
How the act/behaviour can affect the victim group
The affect the type of ASB can have on the location, environment and the community

Part 2

Participants should discuss how the scenario can be prevented in real life, paying attention to alternative behaviour/actions: being more self-aware, respectful and considerate of others.

Peer to peer learning

The variety of situations generated by the different cards can provide additional learning potential. Consider the value of participants sharing their scenario and part 2 discussion with each other by presenting or through role play.

1. Locations sheet
2. Behaviours sheet
3. Victim groups sheet

Move onto Task 3 – ‘ASB law and police powers’

ASB Law and Police Powers

Task 3 is intended to meet the learning outcome for aim number three, building on the learning from task 1 and 2. This activity is designed to increase children/young people’s awareness and understanding the law and consequences in relation to ASB to encourage them to make positive choices.

The activity can be adapted to meet the needs and abilities of individuals, and can be completed as a whole class, as part of a discussion, in small groups or as individuals.

Facilitator Information

To complete the exercise, you will need to print the following resources for participants:

  1. ‘Dealing with ASB’ aide-memoire
  2. ‘Resolving the Problem’ Exercise Sheet
  3. Teacher Reference Sheet

Participants to be introduced to the information in the ‘Dealing with ASB’ sheet to help develop a clearer understanding of the options available to police and local authority to resolve cases of ASB and prevent ongoing issues.

Focusing on one or all of the three examples in the ‘Resolving the Problem’ exercise sheet, participants to decide what action they would take if they were the police and what action those involved can also take to resolve the issue and reduce the risk it continuing.

Peer to peer learning

Consider the value of participants sharing their views and proposed solutions with each other.

1. Dealing with ASB aide-memoire
2. Resolving the problem exercise sheet
3. Teacher Reference sheet

Move onto Task 4 – ‘Signposting to help and support’

ASB Signposting to Support

Task 4 is intended to meet the learning outcome for aim number four. The resources and activities are designed to increase children/young people’s awareness of how and where they can get support at school, online, from the police and other agencies if they ever find themselves affected by ASB related issues. Activities can be adapted to meet the needs and abilities of individuals

Facilitator Information

It is crucial that participants are supported and signposted to where they can get help and information both in school and outside, please ensure they are made aware. Ideas and suggestions to do this are provided below.

Pre-designed poster

Simple poster for display.

Help and support poster

Design a poster template

Safe4me template for individuals to design their own ASB awareness and support poster.

Poster template sheet

Follow on work supported by local police

Local officers can support ongoing work through the Police Apprentice Initiative which tasks children and young people to design solutions to inform their peers in ways such as tangible campaigns, social action projects and awareness raising. For more information on how to get involved in your school/group, please visit the Police Apprentice homepage.

Next steps – Home Learning

ASB Finishing up

The finishing up section re-visits activities from the ‘Getting Started’ section to capture participants learning experience regarding Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB). Activities are designed to be completed after all tasks in the ASB toolkit have been covered according to the one(s) chosen by the facilitator.

Three options are provided to offer flexibility to meet the needs and abilities of individuals which can be completed either as a whole class, as part of a discussion, in small groups or as individuals.

Activity option 1: Class Graffiti Wall

Having completed the first part of this activity as outlined in the ‘Getting Started’ section, re-visit this for the participants to add things they have learned.

Activity option 2: Knowledge Blast Sheet

Having completed the ‘before’ part as outlined in the ‘Getting Started’ section, participants to complete the ‘after’ section.

Knowledge blast sheet

Activity option 3: ‘Before & After’ Knowledge Sheets

Having completed the ‘before’ part as outlined in the ‘Getting Started’ section, participants to complete the ‘after’ section.

Before and after knowledge sheet

ASB Extended Learning

The section provides fun additional activities which are optional as follow-on work, or to take home as part of extending the learning experience beyond the classroom/group into the home. Three options are provided to offer flexibility to meet the needs and abilities of individuals.

Activity 1: Respectful Behaviour

Respectful Behaviour sheet

Activity 2: ASB Wordsearch

ASB wordsearch sheet

Activity 3: Create a Wordsearch

Create a wordsearch sheet